Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Month: November 2018 (Page 1 of 4)

C-SPAN2, December 1 – 2

We’re now seeing if WWI programming will be sustained on the C-SPAN networks now that we’re past the centennial of the Armistice.  This week we’re down to one specific program on C-SPAN2.  Time is Central, as usual.

Douglas Mastriano, Thunder in the Argonne.  Airs on Sunday evening, December 2nd, at 9:30 p.m. ...read more

Famous WW1 Dogfight Photos Were Faked

In the 1970’s a set of 34 photographs known as The Cockburn-Lange Collection and claimed to have been taken by a British pilot in actual WW1 combat were donated to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

In 1985, in an article in the enthusiast magazine Cross and Cockade,  the British Society of WW1 Aero Historians revealed that these photographs were faked by an American named Wesley D. Archer, who had served briefly in the Royal Air Force in 1918 and later embarked on a career in model-making. They even uncovered a photograph of Archer actually staging one of his fakes. ...read more

Kansas Nurses Who Died During the Great War

We’d hoped that we might be able to do biographies of each of these nurses who died during the World War.  That may not happen, but for now, we’ll at least recognize them for their sacrifice.

This list was compiled sometime after the war, and apparently before the Second World War, by Miss Emma Hadorn, A.L.A.  (Presumably American Library Association.)  There may by typos and other errors.  We’d appreciate any corrections, preferably with documentation. ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #55

100 years ago in Kansas, December, 1918:

December 3, 1918.

-Special police patrolled Topeka streets to see that no one violated the influenza quarantine.  Among the deaths was that of Mrs. S.M. Brewster, wife of the Attorney General.

December 4, 1918.

-The State Board of Health had recorded 1,138 deaths from influenza, exclusive of those at Camp Funston and Fort Leavenworth. ...read more

The U.S. Cavalry in WW1

The American cavalry was officially created by an Act of Congress in 1833, although at times prior to this there had been various irregular mounted formations in U.S. service. The American concept of cavalry differed from the European in that the American troopers were not trained or equipped for the same sorts of battle. By French of German standards they weren’t cavalry at all; they were mounted infantry (or rifles), intended to move about quickly on horseback but to engage the enemy dismounted. ...read more

C-SPAN2 & 3, November 18 & 20

We’d hoped that C-SPAN would not give up on WWI programming after giving us several days of great programming leading up to and including the anniversary of the Armistice.  Perhaps they won’t but this week they are giving everyone a break from WWI with only two programs.  As usual, times are Central. ...read more

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