A MINOR APOCALYPSE: EVERYDAY LIFE IN WARSAW DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR

ROBERT BLOBAUM, EBERLY PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 7:00PM | UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS, KU MEMORIAL UNION, ALDERSON AUDITORIUM

The vast majority of Warsaw’s Polish and Jewish residents experienced an existential crisis caused by the collapse of the local economy and the military requisitioning of basic resources, first by the Russians and then on a much larger scale by the Germans. Nearly universal shortages of growing severity and their impacts on public health and inter-communal relations–to which the fall of empires have been attributed—will be compared to shortages documented for cities such as Berlin and Vienna, thus situating Warsaw’s wartime experience within a larger European context.

Robert Blobaum is Eberly Family Distinguished Professor of Modern European History at West Virginia University.  He has published several books and dozens of articles on the history of Poland in the twentieth century, including Rewolucja: Russian Poland, 1904-1907 (Cornell University Press, 1995), winner of the Oskar Halecki Prize for the best book on Polish history published in that year.  His current book on Warsaw during the Great War is scheduled for publication with Cornell University Press in 2016.


 EVERYDAY LIVES ON THE EASTERN FRONT: KU WWI LECTURE SERIES AY 2015/16

The experience of World War I, particularly on its Eastern Front, shaped the modern world in ways that many of us may not realize. The Eastern Front was where the empires of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, and the Ottomans collided and ultimately collapsed, giving rise to new states in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. While the Western Front was defined by trench warfare, the Eastern Front was longer and often porous. It shifted back and forth across civilian populations with dramatically transformative effects, impacting lives at the everyday level. In the region, the Great War was inseparable from revolution, undermining imperial allegiances, generating social and national movements, and changing attitudes about gender and authority.

Over the course of the 2015-2016 academic year this series will bring four nationally recognized experts on WWI to Kansas to share original research on everyday life on the Eastern Front. In addition to public lectures, speakers will explore these themes in workshops with undergraduate and graduate students and members of the community.

ORGANIZERS: Nathan Wood, Associate Professor of History; Erik Scott, Assistant Professor of History; and David Stone, Professor, Strategy and Policy, U.S. Naval War College

SPONSORS: KU Common Book, Big XII Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of History, Dole Institute of Politics, European Studies Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, Humanities Program, Max Kade Center, Office of Graduate Military Programs, University Honors Program, University Press of Kansas.


This program is part of the University of Kansas Centennial Commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at: european.ku.edu/events and kuwwi.com.

Adrienne Landry Dunavin is a member of the Kansas WWI Centennial Commemoration Committee and is the primary administrator of KansasWW1.org. She worked at the KU Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies as their Outreach Coordinator from 2010-2016. During that time she served on the KU WWI Centennial Commemoration Working Group. She continues to volunteer as a representative for CREES and KU WWI on this blog.