Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

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C-SPAN 3 Programming, December 16-20

There’s nothing that feeds the holiday spirit like WWI programming on C-SPAN 3 . . . As usual, all times are Central, and we can’t be responsible for schedule changes. Errors on our part are possible and highly resented.

How World War I Affected the U.S. Airs at 10:02 p.m. on Wednesday, December 16th (that’s tonight!) Repeats at 3:10 a.m. Thursday, December 17th. ...read more

C-SPAN 3 This Weekend

A little bit of WWI-era programming is coming up on C-SPAN 3 this weekend. As usual, all times are Central, and we’re not responsible for schedule changes.

1918 Flu Pandemic. Airs at 8:28 p.m. on Thursday, December 10th, then again at 12;57 a.m. and 8:40 a.m. on Friday, December11th. ...read more

“All is Calm” Update

For those wishing to see “All is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914,” please check your local PBS listings. The Theatre Latte Da production from the Twin Cities is scheduled to be streamed on pbs.org beginning December 15th.

Somewhat disappointing for those of us close to Kansas City and the National World War I Museum and Memorial, local PBS stations have given us only one opportunity a piece to see this presentation, and not under the best scheduling. In Topeka it will air on December 22nd on KTWU-Enhance (11.3) at 11 p.m. CT. On Kansas City PBS-2 it will air on December 27th at 2:00 p.m. CT. ...read more

Who Were (Are) the FANY’s?

Having previously discussed other voluntary service organizations that provided ambulance and nursing services during WW1 (click here), here’s the story of another British group –  The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry, familiarly known as the FANY (their personnel are known as ‘FANY’s’). This is an all-female group organized in 1907 which in WW1 provided ambulances and drivers to the Western Front. Although rebuffed by the British Army who considered them amateurs and totally unsuited to war conditions, the astute FANY leadership quickly attached themselves to the Belgian Army instead, before the War Office got around to banning civilians from travelling to the Front. Click on this link to read about the FANY in WW1. ...read more

Curtailment of Civil Liberties in WW1

Fearing that anti-war speeches and street pamphlets would undermine the war effort, President Woodrow Wilson and Congress passed two laws, the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918, that criminalized any “disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language” about the U.S. government or military, or any speech intended to “incite insubordination, disloyalty, mutiny, or refusal of duty.” The previous Alien and Sedition Acts passed in 1798 had been mostly repealed or had expired by 1802. ...read more

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