Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

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ANZAC Day tribute

ANZAC day has special meaning to Australians and New Zealanders. This can’t be explained solely by the casualty counts – Australia lost 8,709 and New Zealand 2,779 soldiers there, but later in the war these numbers were eclipsed on the Somme, at Messines Ridge and at Passchendaele. As Blair’s previous article postulates, Gallipoli was a nation-building experience for the ANZAC countries. Although the 2020 ANZAC Day was cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic, on the eve the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and Chorus presented this live video performance of this quintessential Australian song. ...read more

WWI on C-SPAN2 & 3, June 6 – 9

Some good programs this week on C-SPAN2 & 3, including several repeats on Chad Williams’ excellent talk on African American activism after World War I, and two programs by Margaret MacMillan, including an also excellent talk given at the National World War I Museum and Memorial last November. All times are Central as usual. ...read more

Ask Smithsonian About 1918 Influenza Art

The June issue of Smithsonian includes a question about art relating to the 1918 Influenza pandemic. The question and the answer are included in their entirety as follows:

Q: Did painters living during the 1918 influenza pandemic portray the experience?

Chase Carter | Washington, D.C.

Some, but not many, documented their personal experiences with influenza: In 1918, the Austrian artist Egon Schiele sketched his wife, Edith, and his mentor Gustav Klimt, both of whom succumbed to the flu. Schiele died from it soon after. In 1919, the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch created self-portraits during his illness and after his recovery. Robyn Asleson, a curator at the National Portrait Gallery, says the American artist John Singer Sargent was painting a mural in Europe when he came down with the flu. The 62-year-old recuperated in a French military tent, which he rendered in his 1918 watercolor The Interior of a Hospital Tent. He wrote of “the accompaniment of groans of wounded, and the chokings and coughing of gassed men, which was a nightmare. It always seemed strange on opening one’s eyes to see the level cots and the dimly lit long tent looking so calm, when one was dozing in pandemonium.” ...read more

WWI on C-SPAN3, May 28 – June 3

Several programs on C-SPAN3 coming up on WWI, including a few taped at last November’s symposium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial (MWWIMM), and others taped at Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. All times are Central as usual.

In fact, if you turn to C-SPAN3 right now (2:00 p.m. Thursday May 28), there are a few programs on now until 7:00 p.m. You can see programs on Psychological Impact on World War I Pilots, American Artifacts: The Lost Battalion, World War I Railroad Operations, American Artifacts: Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, and Domestic Unrest During & After World War I. ...read more

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